Do you have an inner critic bullying you?

How can you manage your inner critic with self-care?

Last week I began sharing with you my thoughts about how you (and probably everyone else) has an inner critic. Before moving forward I would like to remind you that you will also have an inner champion, are you listening to that part of yourself too?

 

Get perspective
When you step back and look at the bigger picture new insights appear

Both of these internalised inner voices are parts of you that have taken on a role. Both were developed unconsciously during your developmental phase and both emerged for a good reason.

 

As a side note, the type of inner voice I am commenting on is part of healthy normal development. There are people who have issues with internalised voices as a mental health issue. If you have any voices urging self-harm or violent behaviour please seek support and help from an appropriate qualified professional.

 

The focus today is on managing the inner critic. Last week I gave you some tips about acknowledging and evaluating the messages from the inner critic.

 

If your inner critic is particularly loud write down the script. By writing it down you will be able to get some distance and perspective.

 

Now write down what you think the positive intention is behind the script.

 

Definition: Positive intention is a term used in NLP to mean the motivation behind a thought, feeling or behaviour. The presupposition in NLP is that your unconscious is responsible for your patterns of thinking and behaving.

 

Your unconscious has a positive drive and is trying to protect you the best it can. Sometimes it has not enough or faulty information and so develops patterns that appear negative. Here is an example that illustrates what I mean.

 

An adult has a tendency to want to please others and say “yes” when they would really rather say “no”.

 

This pattern could have emerged for a variety of reasons, one could be that in childhood this person experienced disapproval from parental figures for saying “no”. Using child logic they developed a belief that the only way to be loved and approved of was to please others. This belief is held unconsciously and yet runs the adult’s responses.

 

Whenever this adult considers saying “no” to others or pleasing themselves the inner critic replays a version of those early messages. You may or may not consciously hear them however the emotions created are felt.

 

If this person continues to say “no” or please themselves their inner critic will continue commenting perhaps triggering feelings of guilt and low self-worth.

 

If the person suppresses their desire to say “no” or please themselves they may get a sense of relief coupled with other feelings such as low self-worth and unhappiness.

 

This has created a double bind, damned if you do damned if you don’t. Is this feeling familiar?

 

Now to return to my suggestion of writing down the script of the inner critic, as you review your own scripts consider “who was the author?”

 

The chances are the author will have been parental figures who in most cases had good intentions. By writing down your script you may gain some new insights that allow you to make changes.

 

Insights can be very powerful however sometimes insights are not enough. Have you ever had the experience of understanding something logically but hanging on to it emotionally?

 

This is a really common experience and this is where NLP can help you. There are many techniques in NLP that can help you re-write your script and become the author of your own life.

 

Here is a link to a free download which includes a technique called “Changing Beliefs”. The recording is taken from a workshop delivered as part of my NLP Research Dissertation into NLP as a way of improving Self-esteem and Well-being.

Next week I will share some ways of changing the sub-modalities of your inner critic to reduce the impact and perhaps transform your experience.

I am pleased to share with you that I have been nominated for the Research Award at the NLP Awards in London this May.

Are you being kind to yourself?

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve been sharing with you some questions to check how well you are taking care of yourself.

In my work as a therapist I have noticed something that many of you will also be aware of. Most people are their own worst critics. Have you been criticising yourself for not being kind to yourself?

Take a moment to consider what this means. This is a paradox. You are criticising yourself and not taking care of yourself. Consider this too. Whose voice is that inner critic? Is it really your own?

Many people have internalised this inner critic and come to believe it is their own voice however the chances are this form of internal chatter really came originally from someone else. Usually this person was one of your primary care givers. In most cases this person genuinely was trying to help you and believed their comments to you were “for your own good”.

Today I invite you to make friends with your inner critic. (Please remember if you criticise your inner critic this is another way to be unkind to yourself).

Thank this internal part of yourself, recognise that this part of you was probably trying to protect you or help you do something or avoid something. It has good intentions.

Learn to notice when your inner critic is speaking to you. Acknowledge it and then ask a question.

“Is this criticism helping me right now, in the here and now”.

If it is, thank the critic and let it know you have taken note. Take the appropriate action gently and with self-compassion.

If the critic is out of date, thank the critic and let it know this advice can be archived.

Try out these steps over the next week or so and notice what happens. Next week I will share with you some ways to change how you hear your inner critic so that it no longer feels harsh.

Are you minding your mind?

How is your psychological self-care? Are you minding your mind?

Checking how you care for yourself psychologically…

This week I will offer one final audit for you to carry out, psychological self-care. So what do you mean when you say “psychological self-care”?

 

That’s a great question, I’m glad you asked. From my perspective this is about your internal representations and that means how you store information. This will be in the form of thoughts, images, sounds, sensations, emotions and even taste and smell. These in turn will create patterns of thought, responding and behaviour.

 

So here is this week’s audit.

 

  1. How are you talking to yourself? Are you kind? Are you critical?
  2. When you check your internal image of yourself, how do you see yourself?
  3. How do you respond to compliments?
  4. How do your respond to critical feedback?
  5. What are you believing about yourself that is limiting you in some way? What are you believing about yourself that empowers you in some way?
  6. What are you believing about others that creates challenges? What are you believing about others that creates connection?
  7. What are your patterns in significant relationships?
  8. What is your relationship to confidence?
  9. What is your sense of self? Do you value yourself? Do recognise your worth?
  10. Where in your life are you unfulfilled (if anywhere) and how are your thoughts connected to that?

As with the previous audits, consider what questions I’ve left out.

 

What else is important to you?

 

You might want to consider an audit for your self-care in regards to Spirituality, in relationships or behaviourally. I’ll leave you to reflect on those for yourself and next week we will begin exploring strategies for self-care.

 

 

 

How well do you understand yourself?

Helping yourself
Self-care is all about looking after yourself. You can’t help someone else if you are running on empty

Emotional intelligence is not just about understanding others.

Last week I invited you to take an audit of your how well you are applying self-care to yourself physically. I wonder how you got on and if you have already made some adjustments based on your own reflections.

Later in the series I will come back to each of the points we audited last time with some ideas on how to look after yourself even better on the physical level.

Before we do that let us continue with the audit, this time the focus is on Emotional Self-care. Here are the next set of questions:

  1. Do you recognise your own emotions when you are experiencing them?
  2. Do you know the difference between here and now emotions and historically conditioned emotions?
  3. Are you associated or disassociated when you experience emotions?
  4. Does it vary depending on which emotion it is?
  5. Are there some emotions you believe are not okay?
  6. Are you aware of specific triggers for specific emotional responses?
  7. Do you ever feel out of control with your emotions?
  8. Do you ever feel remote and disconnected from your emotions?
  9. Are you aware of how personality difference might impact on emotions?
  10. Do you have strategies for managing your own emotions?

What questions have I missed out? Let me know what else is important to you for emotional self-care.

Next week the audit will be for Psychological Self-care.

Auditing your self-care journey. How are you doing?

Last week I began my new series focusing on self-care with an overview and introduction. This week about self-assessment and I recommend you take a few minutes over the next few days to complete this short self-audit.

In order to get the most out of this series you might want to begin a self-care journal to record your answers, thoughts, feelings and actions.

Here are your questions on self-care questions for Physical self-care.

  1. Do you in general terms take care of your body and health?
  2. Do assess situations that might involve physical risk or do you rush in?
  3. Do you get enough sleep? If not, is there a reason?
  4. Do you eat healthily? Do you know what healthy eating is?
  5. Are you over-weight, under-weight or within healthy guidelines for weight?
  6. Do you take the recommended levels of exercise? Do you know what recommended levels are? Do you do too much, not enough or at a healthy balance for exercise?
  7. Do you get regular health checks such as dentist, opticians etc? Do you get a regular general check up?
  8. Do you pay attention to your body and listen to feedback from your body?
  9. Do you take time to relax? For example do you meditate, use self-hypnosis, listen to music, walk in nature?
  10. Do you dance? Do you play? Do you laugh?
Find health in nature

What questions have I missed out? Let me know what else is important to you for physical self-care.

Next week the audit will be for Emotional Self-care.

 

Do you know what self-care is?

Self-care
Find your authentic self by stepping outside your comfort zone as part of your self-care practice

How well are you nurturing yourself?

This week I would like to start a new series of discussions on self-care beginning with an introduction. Over the next few weeks I will expand on this theme.

What is self-care?

My definition of self-care is the operationalisation of healthy self-esteem. Healthy self-esteem is where you recognise your own value and worth as a human being and crucially also recognise the value and worth of others.

When you recognise your own worth and value you look after yourself on all levels, physically, emotionally, psychologically and spiritually. You ensure that you remain healthy in relationships including intimate, family, friends, colleagues and even with chance encounters.

I will share my thoughts and include some ideas about how to develop your personal practice of self-care more fully. I welcome interaction and discussion so will be setting up a forum for discussion (more details coming soon).

Self-disclaimer: I am a work in progress myself. Most of us are, no matter how much personal development you have. When I self-assess I estimate that 90% of time I am in a healthy place particularly however there are some areas still requiring some attention.

I will be using this series myself to continue my journey.

Will you join me?

Next week we will begin the journey with some self-assessment and a place to start making changes.

Welcome to the Wellbeing Club!

Wellbeing is a rather hot topic at the moment. I wonder how are you doing with your own self-care?

Take a moment to consider, how do you want to BE?

You know what it is like when you are so busy doing that you forget what it is to be. 

What if you were to take the time to write down in a journal how you want to be in the world in terms of what emotions you want to experience regularly, who you want to feel connected to and what has the most meaning in your life.

Would you change what you focus on?

My challenge to you is to take some time today to just sit with this idea. Write down your thoughts, feelings and dreams or vision.

How close are you to being the way you want to be?

What is stopping you?

Write this down too. Next time I will share some thoughts with you about how to make some changes if that is what you want to do.

If you would also like to read my blog on resilience please click here

 

 

 

How are limiting beliefs created?

People often ask me “how  are limiting beliefs are created?” This can be the first step in the realisation that the thinking patterns that have been holding you back can be understood and changed. By asking the question the door is open to the possibility of transformation.

From a research perspective it is fair to say our evidence is anecdotal and comes from observation. Setting up a research model is problematic from both a practical and ethical position.

Leaving that aside when I share my belief about the formation of beliefs most people can relate.

Limiting beliefs, Empowering beliefs and neutral beliefs are all formed by the same processes and mechanisms. There are two primary processesinvolved and both have an external source.

I am sure you will not be surprised that the majority of our core belief systemis in place from a very early age and although we might adjust our beliefs, the basic structure is very resilient and resistant to change.

Both of the primary processes are in play simultaneously so let us consider them each in turn. Firstly, beliefs can be created by constant repetitionin the form of feedback and messages we receive especially those we get from our primary care givers such as parents. As children we assume our parents are all knowingand if they give us messages about our capabilities, our self-worth and about how the world works we are likely to accept these messages.

For instance, if a parent is constantly telling a child they are clumsy there will be an internalising of this message. Even if the child appears to make extra effort to be careful and even becomes known for that quality as an adult, the message has still been internalised. The very act of being extra careful is driven by a fearof people discovering how clumsy our example person is. Alternatively, the same message may result in a person who provides countless examples that the statement about them being clumsy is true.

So, whether we try to be the opposite or we directly accept the role we are still internalising the beliefabout being clumsy.

This same processwould also be responsible for a person taking on a positive beliefsuch as being clever or creative. All of this, with both Limiting and Empowering beliefs happens outside our conscious awareness. We take in the thinking pattern that creates the belief by osmosis and with little conscious processing.

Perhaps an even more fascinating aspect of this process is what happens when a child takes on a belief based on the constant repetition of what is not said. This can often happen where there are siblings. If one child is constantly praised for a particular quality such as creativity but this quality is never attributed to the child’s sister an unwitting message is being delivered. Child logicof the sister is such that the child may take on a belief that she is not creative because she is never told that she is. The parents in this case may not think that at all and were unaware of the unconscious response of their child.

The second of the processes responsible for the creating of beliefs is linked to high emotional loadand could be described as trauma. However, this may be misleading as we do get Empowering beliefsthis way too.

Let me expand, a belief or a series of beliefs can arise from one experience where the emotional intensity is particularly high. The emotions could be anything from fear, loss, anger through to joy or feelings of achievement. The key is high intensity chained to high meaning.

In terms of Limiting beliefs, I have worked with many clients who had a “shame”or “humiliation”experience that converted into feelings of low self-worthand confidence. I have also spoken with other people who have a key moment of inspirationbased on an experience in early childhoodthat created a positive drive and a resilient mind-set.

On Wednesday, 9thMay our NLP Practice groupwill explore this topic further. Do email me if you would like to join us. melody@gwinzlp.com

 

What are Limiting Beliefs and can they be changed?

Have you ever noticed how you hold yourself back from certain things? Sometimes these will be tasks or activities you know logically that you are capable of and yet there is another part of you that is convinced you will never succeed.

Perhaps even more challenging are those personal things you think about yourself as a person that on one level you know they are not true and yet emotionally you hold a conviction that they are fact.

The above are just two examples of limiting beliefs. Often we do not label them as beliefs because we think they are “concrete facts”.

We will defend these limitations, arguing that we have evidence to support these “truths”. On a more positive level we will do the same thing about empowering beliefs we hold about ourselves, others and the world.

Usually it is far easier to spot when someone else is clinging to a limiting belief. We will hear them make a statement about themselves or their abilities that we, the observer, would challenge. We are often able to present counter evidenceand yet the other person is unable to accept even the most well intentioned, gentle and kind feedback.

So, if you want to identify some of your own limiting beliefs, stop for a moment and consider, where in your life have others tried to offer you counter evidence about self-stated truths about you?

There are other ways to track down your limiting beliefs and sometimes we need the help of a skilled professional.

If you want to understand a little bit more about how limiting beliefs are created download my free audio click here.

This audio is a two hour segment from a workshop I ran with 60 people research “Does NLP improve Self-Esteem?” This was part of my research dissertation for my Masters Degree in Applied Positive Psychology and you will be pleased to know the evidence was “yes it does”.

You will also be able to join in with an exercise from NLP that is designed to help you shift that limiting belief and swap it for an Empowering Self Belief that will allow you to shine.

If you are ready to transform your life it might be time to enrol on our NLP PractitionerProgramme and start your own journey of change. Our programme is spread over 4 modules each of 4 days giving you time consolidate both your learning and your transformation.

If you are still not quite sure you can join us for a taster day for just £19.95. This fee covers the costs and is deducted from your invoice when you sign up for either the NLP Diploma or the full NLP Practitioner Training.

Our next one is on 21stJune and there is an alternate date of 21stAugust. Do join us and start making those important changes today!

 

I am also available for individual sessions using NLP, Hypnotherapy, Core Transformations, the Wholeness Process, Positive Psychology and Transactional Analysis.

Contact me direct for more details at melody@gwiznlp.com

 

 

 

 

 

How is Hypnotherapy different from Stage Hypnosis

I am often asked this question particularly by people who are concerned about the safety of Hypnotherapy. The simple answer is they are like chalk and cheese.

Hypnotherapy is primarily concerned with helping people and Professional Hypnotherapists will have Accredited qualifications, be members of professional bodies and will be committed to ethical practice. Qualified Hypnotherapists use hypnosis to help people with issues ranging from smoking cessation, weight loss, anxiety, stress and pain control, through to full medical hypnosis for patients who are allergic to anaesthesia. The client’s well-fare and well-being are the highest priority.

Stage hypnosis is primarily a show where the person conducting the event is more interested in entertaining the public than the welfare of the people invited on stage. A careful selection process is used to ensure that only people who will provide this entertainment get as far as the stage and many of the factors have nothing to do with hypnosis. For instance, the people selected are usually extroverts who enjoy being the centre of attention and who will not be concerned if they make a fool of themselves.

Sadly, stage hypnosis sometimes brings Hypnotherapy into disrepute by association and promotes myths about hypnosis. If you are considering Hypnotherapy for yourself or a family member it is okay to ask your Hypnotherapist about your concerns. Any well trained Hypnotherapist will be happy to answer your questions and reassure you.

If you are looking for Hypnotherapy Training as a new career make sure you find a training provider who offers Accredited Training plus ongoing support, mentoring and supervision. This is key to ensure that you develop your own good practice.

If you are looking for Hypnotherapy Training as a new career make sure you find a training provider who offers Accredited Training plus ongoing support, mentoring and supervision. This is key to ensure that you develop your own good practice.

If you are interested in finding out more about my training programmes in Hypnotherapy click here for details, including my next module in Hypnotherapy starting on 15th April. We are Accredited with both General Hypnotherapy Standards Council and American Board of Hypnotherapy.

Recognised by ABH